Kellogg’s Crap Flakes

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I am working this week in France, and something has really been bothering me.
Why are European versions of American cereal so crappy?!?

It is bad enough that the cartoon mascots on the European cereal boxes look stupid in comparison to their American counterparts. Have you ever seen the French ‘Snap,’ ‘Crackle,’ and ‘Pop?’ These Rice Krispies elves look like they were drawn by somebody who has never seen real cereal-making elves, and then these versions seemed to have been photoshopped to have a dumb glossy finish and a plasticky look.
But fine, screw with the packaging all you want, what I am fed up with is pouring a box of Corn Flakes in France, and getting a bowl full of crap-flakes. The European versions of my cereal staples have a different texture and a different taste from what I have always known and loved. While uniquely European cereals can be amazing(like their Ovomaltine Cereal), these cereal copy-cats are pathetic impostors that just aren’t very good. Each morning while I am in France, I am disappointed by the nonsense I pour into my bowl as soon as I take my first bite and realize it was not what I was expecting, and does not deserve to have the same name as the cereal legends found in America.

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Categories: Rants

Author:Mr. Fed Up

A guy looking for good grub. and YES....I have a website...and I am not going to bore you with one of those personal journal type of blogs. I promise. Check it out; www.FedUpFood.com

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10 Comments on “Kellogg’s Crap Flakes”

  1. September 7, 2012 at 11:00 am #

    And, at the same time, some of our big brands market flavors only in other countries. I’m still grumpy about my inability to get Wasabi Pringles in the U.S.

    But you are right, if they are so different in taste and texture, then they are not the same thing and they should be tricking us into thinking we are getting a known quantity when we are traveling. Give them a different name.

    • September 18, 2012 at 10:52 am #

      Yes! I agree completely! Or at least call the ‘Corn Flakes EU’ or something similar.

  2. Sylvie
    September 20, 2012 at 10:14 pm #

    Why waste your time on cereals for breakfast when you are in France for a few days when you can simply walk to a boulangerie and have many awesome choices? I hope you had a better “food experience” than the crapy cereals during your stay.

    • September 24, 2012 at 8:58 pm #

      I was there working and stuck at the airport hotel…not too many options sadly.

      • Sylvie
        September 24, 2012 at 9:07 pm #

        I forgive you then 😉

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